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The 2012 Integrated Training Summit will take place May 21-25 in Nashville, Tennessee.

Monday, May 21st

C. Advanced Disaster Life Support (ADLS)

08:00 - 17:00

16-hour workshop, continued on Tuesday

Summary

ADLS® is an advanced practicum course for the trained BDLS® provider. It is an intensive, 2-day course that allows students to demonstrate competencies in casualty decontamination, specified essential skills, and mass casualty incident information systems/technology applications. Using simulated, all-hazards scenarios and mass causality incidents, ADLS® makes use of four interactive sessions in which participants treat simulated patients in various disaster drills and situations. Training is focused on the development of hands-on skills to allow participants to apply the knowledge learned in BDLS®.

ADLS®'s interactive scenarios and drills utilize high-fidelity mannequins and volunteer patients to simulate a realistic experience in treating pathologic patient conditions not routinely encountered by the responders and health care providers. Hands-on exercises teach practical skills, such as decontamination and use of protective equipment, and provide instruction in topics that traditionally are not addressed in health care education curricula.

Day 2 of ADLS® is the "hands on" day of training. Four skills stations reinforce the previous day's learning. These skills stations are as follows:

Objectives

  1. Apply the BDLS D-I-S-A-S-T-E-R paradigm to respond to various disaster scenarios and treat simulated patients using high-fidelity manikins
  2. Apply the BLDS triage model utilizing M.A.S.S. and “ID-me”; demonstrate decontamination techniques for disaster scenarios with contaminated casualties and the correct use of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for various hazardous scenarios
  3. Practice the use of auto-injectors for the treatment of chemical casualties; practice small pox immunization with bifurcated needles; obtain information about the Strategic National Stockpile at a Disaster Skills Station

Intended Audience

Presenters

D. Navigation Skills for Disaster Response

08:00 - 12:00

Summary

All response team members deploying to disasters need an understanding of the fundamentals of land navigation as well as the newly mandated U.S. National Grid System. Whether DMAT, DMORT, VMAT, or US&R, personnel should always know where they are, how to return, how to direct others, as well as identify the location of victims, medical facilities, landing zones, and other key landmarks. This concentrated course will teach the basics of typical navigation skills and tools, map and compass, and new devices and aids.

Using actual case histories from previous disaster deployments, the course will also cover signage, route finding, pattern recognition, map datum, as well as the practical application of these concepts in the altered disaster environment. The class will additionally review the fundamentals of the U.S. National Grid System (USNGS). Due to the limitations of class size, indoor conference facilities, and equipment variability and availability, field training will not be possible. Further practical experience in this perishable skill is highly encouraged for all team members at home.

Objectives

  1. Describe the basics of land navigation
  2. Apply the basics of land navigation in disasters
  3. Explain the U.S. National Grid System

Intended Audience

Presenters

E. Practical Application of the Hospital HVA and Its Incorporation into the Emergency Management Program

08:00 - 12:00

Summary

One of the primary goals of an emergency management program is to reduce organizational risk. This may include the safety of patients, visitors and staff as well as preventing the disruption of patient care services or minimizing resulting damage to the facility.

This session will provide practical steps and tools for using a hazards and vulnerability analysis (HVA) to target and measure risk reduction through specific quality improvement indicators. Participants will simulate a multi-disciplinary hospital safety committee. Based on information provided regarding a mid-size general acute care hospital, members will walk through the steps necessary to complete an HVA including interpretation of the results and inclusion of regional/community assessments.

Once completed, the committee will be provided with a selection of quality improvement opportunities such as enhancements to the emergency operations plan, response and functional annexes, incident management team selection and general emergency management training. The participants will apply the completed HVA to the development of the annual mitigation, preparedness and instructional activities along with exercise conduct to assess the activities. In addition, the committee will prepare an exercise program outline including developing specific objectives for a functional exercise about a scenario involving a surge of patients entering the facility.

At the conclusion of this session, the committee will host a brief exercise after action review and describe what to be included within the improvement plan and ultimately how to re-evaluate the HVA to demonstrate organizational risk reduction. Practical examples will be used throughout this session which will be available to attendees for adoption or modification within their own facilities.

Objectives

  1. Explain how the hospital HVA is the cornerstone of building a comprehensive emergency management program (EMP)
  2. Identify specific components and steps for incorporating the HVA into the EMP
  3. Discuss how to evaluate organization risk reduction through these activities

Intended Audience

Presenters

F. Certified Healthcare Emergency Professional (CHEP)

08:00 - 17:00

Summary

The Certified Healthcare Emergency Professional (CHEP) credential has been created especially for healthcare emergency executives, managers, coordinators and associates. Unlike other healthcare-related certifications, the CHEP is not clinically or first responder oriented—it was designed specifically for the emergency professional working in a healthcare setting.

Someone with a CHEP credential has demonstrated knowledge of information, standards, and best practices from reliable sources,

and others. The certification examination also covers areas with which a healthcare emergency manager should be familiar, such as, the Incident Command System, National Incident Management System, Hazard Vulnerability Analysis, accreditation standards, safety, and the handling of chemicals.

This class is not for beginning emergency professionals but for individuals who have indepth experience through time, knowledge or both. The course consists of one and one-half days of didactic refresher training and then culminates on the second day with the certification examination.

Objectives

  1. Evaluate the knowledge and capabilities of practitioners engaged in the administration of healthcare emergency management practice
  2. Evaluate competence in the use of management, leadership, and system principles by healthcare emergency preparedness professionals
  3. Provide recognition for individual emergency management professionals who meet certification requirements

Intended Audience

Presenters

G. Simulation Training for Disaster Response in Austere Environments: Fostering Teamwork

08:00 - 12:00

Summary

Disaster responders are frequently challenged to provide clinical care in a foreign environment with other providers from other disciplines with whom they rarely work or have never met. This full scale high simulation session will expand on the simulation course taught at the 2011 Integrated Training Summit.

In addition to using high fidelity simulation to prepare providers for their role in disaster response, particularly in austere environments, the goal for the 2012 Integrated Training Summit course will be to foster development of teamwork. Simulations will animate real disaster settings and scenarios.

The course will provide tools to enhance communication and effective team dynamics between unfamiliar providers and help create a high functioning, multidisciplinary, cohesive team using principals of crisis resource management. We will provide a low risk, highly supportive learning environment to encourage all providers to participate, regardless of the level of experience. An additional goal of the workshop will be to promote the use of simulation as an adjunct for training our disaster responders.

The course will consist of an interactive didactic session to discuss general principles and practices of disaster response, addressing different types of responses and the integration of NDMS teams with other agencies. Respective Concepts of Operations (CONOPS), provider mixes and skill sets will be covered, as well as the types and levels of care that may be required. In the simulation, we will animate real pediatric and adult patient scenarios, focusing on illness and injuries commonly seen in disasters/disaster response.

At the end of the workshop, participants will assess their team experience and demonstrate the effective teamwork concepts learned through the simulation experience. The participants will be provided with a high level overview of the resources and skills needed to develop and lead simulation sessions and/or courses to help prepare providers for disaster response.

Objectives

  1. Explain the use of high fidelity simulation to demonstrate general principles and practices of disaster response
  2. Discuss how to develop teamwork utilizing effective team dynamics and the concepts and practices of crisis resource management
  3. Practice providing patient care in scenarios designed to simulate an austere environment setting

Intended Audience

Presenters

H. Using HSEEP Tools to Develop Effective Hospital Exercises

13:00 - 17:00

Summary

This workshop provides attendees with the tools and techniques to develop an effective exercise program consistent with the Homeland Security Exercise Evaluation Program (HSEEP). The workshop will discuss how to design effective exercises while addressing and coordinating regulatory, grant, and accreditation requirements. The workshop is presented in a flexible, instructor-led format with hands on training that utilizes reference materials and activities-based applications. The workshop is customized for healthcare use while maintaining consistency with HSEEP principles.

The workshop guides participants in the customization of partner organizations, regional and statewide exercises to meet hospital specific needs. Components of the workshop include exercise design, development, conduct, evaluation, and improvement planning. Workshop activities include writing effective and measurable objectives that test the component of a comprehensive emergency management program developing a Master Scenario Events List that coordinates with your objectives, and writing an Improvement Plan to facilitate better response capabilities within your organization and with other partners.

Objectives

  1. Demonstrate how to develop objectives that are simple, measurable, realistic and task oriented
  2. Demonstrate the process to coordinate healthcare regulatory, accreditation, and grant exercise requirements
  3. Demonstrate the process to develop an exercise Improvement Plan

Intended Audience

Presenters

I. Suturing

07:30 - 09:30

This workshop is being offered multiple times. Please be sure to register for only one.

Summary

This hands-on workshop introduces wound evaluation, cleaning, numbing, and closure techniques to healthcare providers who are inexperienced in suturing. Pig's feet will be used to practice various suturing techniques. This course is designed primarily for the non-physician. This course can be used as part of an ongoing training program to gain wound closure privileges.

Objectives

  1. Identify lacerations, cuts, and wounds that are amenable to simple closure
  2. Describe proper wound cleaning and preparation for closure
  3. Explain selection of appropriate suture material
  4. Describe the indications for the use of simple interrupted, running, and mattress stitches
  5. Demonstrate the above suturing techniques for skin closure

Intended Audience

Presenters

J. Suturing

10:00 - 12:00

For a full description, please see Workshop I.

K. Suturing

13:00 - 15:00

For a full description, please see Workshop I.

L. Suturing

15:30 - 17:30

For a full description, please see Workshop I.

M. Where They Are @: Utilizing Social Networking to Communicate Prevention, Preparedness, Response and Recovery Information

08:00 - 12:00

Summary

Learn how Facebook, Twitter, blogs and RSS feeds can enhance traditional crisis communications in every phase of the emergency management continuum: prevention, preparedness, response and recovery with a particular focus on reaching underserved and vulnerable populations.

Best practice examples will be referenced to provide a framework for discussion on how hospitals and public agencies are currently using social media to their fullest potential before, during, and after disasters to boost resiliency. Specific consideration will be given to the following: Establishing your agencies' goals and objectives; Policies and issue considerations specific to social media and other interactive web-based platforms; Resources and training necessary for implementation; Integrating your social media communications into the Joint Information System as part of Unified Command.

Objectives

  1. Analyze and discuss the benefits and challenges associated with employing Social Media technologies in public health and crisis communications
  2. Define ways to utilize social media to reach underserved and vulnerable populations, particularly during the critical prevention and preparedness phases
  3. Describe steps on how to integrate these new communication tools into current public health emergency management communications plans, policies and procedures and assess how they fit into the Joint Information System

Intended Audience

Presenters

N. Disaster Response: Are you Ready for the Kids? A Refresher on Basic Pediatric MCI Triage and Care

13:00 - 17:00

Summary

In any disaster situation, the pediatric population will be among the most vulnerable victims. In most situations they will be cared for, not by pediatric specialists in a pediatric specialty hospital, but by primarily adult trained medical personnel. As is demonstrated by population and resource studies done in King Country, WA and in neighboring Pierce County by the Healthcare Coalition Pediatric Taskforce, the majority of the pediatric populations live well away from the pediatric specialty care facilities and closer to community hospitals, urgent care centers, and private practices. Therefore consistent and regular pediatric training is vital to maintaining the necessary management skills and knowledge base.

This workshop is primarily directed to non-pediatric care providers and emergency management personnel interested in developing or refreshing basic pediatric skills and knowledge. The presentation will be divided into two sections, the first is a brief clinical review of basic pediatric triage, assessment and treatment with emphasis on a length-based color coding system and the Pediatric Assessment Triangle.

The 3 main MCI triage protocols (START, JumpSTART and SALT) will be reviewed but with an eye towards specific pediatric needs. The second half is intended to be interactive and provide the audience with practice using the previously described techniques and knowledge. Participants will have the opportunity to practice MCI triage and basic pediatric stabilization using both mock patient profiles and actual patient encounters from field experience in Haiti 2010.

Training tools and just-in-time training techniques will be provided so that hospitals, DMAT, EMS, air transport personnel, and MRC's will be ready to manage pediatric disaster victims.

Objectives

  1. Describe the 3 basic MCI triage systems and the benefits / pitfalls of each when triaging pediatric patients with information based on field experience in Haiti 2010
  2. Accurately calculate pediatric dosages, sizes and initial resuscitation techniques needed in a disaster and in austere environments
  3. Review take home tools, pearls, just in time training resources to implement in the participant's home environment

Intended Audience

Presenters

O. MedMap Discussion (Open Attendance)

09:00 - 11:00

Summary

MedMap is a secure Geographic Information System (GIS) based, electronic, interactive mapping application. This application incorporates information from numerous sources both internal and external to HHS, other Federal and public agencies into a single visual environment for enhanced situational awareness, assessment, and management of resources for planning as well as for response to a natural, man-made or pandemic event.

This system supports functions such as policy analysis, planning, course of action comparison, incident management, and training. It supports the needs of decision makers at various levels of management within HHS and other Federal agencies to provide enhanced situational awareness at a level of granularity needed for all responders including, regional emergency coordinators and teams in the field. It is, also, able to display and provide details on medical care sites, resources and mobilization points; provide analytical tools for planning and preparedness efforts.

During a large event such as an improvised explosive device (IED) or hurricane, there is the need to immediately determine medical care sites, resources and mobilization points and modify needed data as it becomes available and changes. Rapidly changing conditions and the need for a large regional and national response requires extensive pre-planning and a highly flexible system as well as the ability for data from the field to seamlessly get to leadership removed from the scene and aid in the planning of the event's response. MedMap is able to display many different datasets and data feeds including local data feeds to help all involved work with a more complete aggregation of data.

With a fully customizable interface individual users are able to define the data layers that they need for a specific event or need. Accounts to access MedMap are created on an individual basis (no group access accounts). External user accounts will become available in the first quarter of 2011.

Objectives

  1. Access the application and utilize the tools within MedMap
  2. Explain how to add and display data within the interface, while also being able to perform simple spatial analysis
  3. Demonstrate how to export tables, PDF maps and JPGs for use outside of MedMap

Intended Audience

Presenters

P. MedMap Hands-On (Limited Attendance)

13:00 - 15:00

Summary

There is no fee to attend this two-hour discussion/workshop. Space is limited! This workshop will be a hands-on demonstration of the MedMap and will compliment the 9-11am discussion. You may register for both sessions.

For a full description, please see Workshop O.

X. Mass Casualty Incident Management

08:00 - 17:00

16-hour workshop, continued on Tuesday

Summary

This course is designed for anyone involved in delivering emergency services as a result of a mass- casualty incident. A community's EMS, fire, rescue, police, aeromedical, fire-police, emergency department and dispatch center personnel should attend since joint response and coordination is crucial to the successfully managing of any multiple-victim incident. This offers an equal amount of didactic and practical demonstrations to the participants, ensuring that the students understand and appreciate the proper principles and procedures for successful management of mass casualty incidents.

Participants will be provided with factual and graphic information along with examples of how to manage and/or function cooperatively at actual, or potential, mass-casualty incidents. Participants will also learn the roles and responsibilities of each key command officer and participating agency at mass-casualty incidents. Emphasis will be placed on procedures and techniques that can be implemented easily and inexpensively to expedite patient care, identification, removal and distribution from the scenes encountered.

Methods will be presented for:

Problems encountered at actual MCI scenes will be explored, along with steps that can be taken by individuals and agencies to correct system errors or deficiencies and improve their overall management of mass-casualty incident scenes.

Objectives

  1. Explain important MCI scene command and control considerations
  2. Discuss Ways to integrate EMS command aspects into the overall IC system
  3. Recite how to prearrange and deploy EMS Task Forces in the field
  4. Discuss the importance of reliable communications at an MCI scene
  5. Describe critical scene safety aspects, security concerns and hazard control
  6. Identify the roles and responsibilities of EMS sector officers

Intended Audience

Presenters

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