THURSDAY, MAY 24TH

Open Access: limited to 40 participants.

This workshop will allow experienced users an opportunity to become familiar with the latest version of the JPATS web application. Following a brief review of the changes in v.4, attendees will participate in a hands-on, simulated, patient movement exercise featuring JPATS v.4. Participants will register and track patients from the casualty collection point to definitive care through return to home. The exercise will allow participants to work through advanced scenarios and troubleshoot common problems. New mobile platforms and data capture technology will be featured for use in the exercise. NDMS participants completing the exercise will satisfy the biannual refresher requirement for the HHS JPATS Strike Team.

This course is for the experienced user only. Basic application training will not be covered in this workshop. Inexperienced or new users may consider attending the Introduction to JPATS and JPATS Basic Application Training workshops.

  1. Review the changes in functionality in version 4.
  2. Demonstrate the procedure for capturing and attaching patient photos.
  3. Set up and demonstrate the barcode scanner.
  4. Complete patient manifests.
  5. Generate each type of report and identify the data contained in each.
  6. Using the data elements found on the JPATS dashboard, recite a verbal summary report of patient movement activity at a specific location.
  7. List the resources for obtaining additional IT help in the field.

  • Emergency physicians
  • EMT/paramedics
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Respiratory therapists

  • Jeremy Barnes, MLA, MS
  • Martha Barts, RN, MSN, CCRN
  • Christian Boone, BA
  • Shamera Boone, EMT-P
  • Tori Chesebrough-Buckles, Esq.
  • Chris Crabtree, MPA, BA
  • Kendra Frampton, BBA, MA, MP
  • Johnathan Gaddy, NREMT
  • John Howe Jr.
  • Alicia Jones, DO
  • Chuck Knell, BS, BA
  • Jeannie Krick
  • Kevin Kupitz, PhD, MS
  • Joseph Lamana, MPA, RN
  • Cindy Larson
  • Charles Minor
  • Jeff Orphal
  • John Probst
  • Dan Stoudt, MS
  • Gregg Taggard
  • Laura Walker, AA
  • Michael Yamamoto, NREMT, BS
  • Peter Yang, BS
  • Beth Zealley, MBA, BS

10:30 – 11:45

For a full description, please see Wednesday’s description.

10:30 – 11:45

For a full description, please see Wednesday’s description.

13:15 – 14:30

For a full description, please see Wednesday’s description.

13:15 – 14:30

For a full description, please see Wednesday’s description.

15:15 – 16:45

For a full description, please see Wednesday’s description.

08:30 – 09:45

Disasters are characterized by an overwhelming imbalance between needs and resources. In the face of this imbalance, difficult decisions about allocation of resources have to be made and implemented by policy makers, public health officials and clinicians caring for victims at the bedside. These decisions have important ethical content and can generate tremendous moral distress. We do not, however, have a clear and coherent framework to help guide ethical decision making in the setting of acute disasters.

This presentation will include an overview of important ethical challenges in disaster response and discuss work on the development of a framework that can help responders and policy makers avoid the most recognizable mistakes. Case studies will be used to gather audience input and comment from a panel of response experts.

  1. Discuss some of the typical ethical dilemmas that occur in the wake of a disaster, including the implications of triage and bedside rationing.
  2. Explain how advance preparation and discussion may help to mitigate moral distress during a disaster.
  3. Describe a set of ethical principles that could help to shape decision-making in disasters.

  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Healthcare Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Respiratory Therapists

10:15 – 11:30

Volunteers can be critical to a successful Public Health Response, but utilizing them effectively in a way that is beneficial to everyone can be a challenge. Placing volunteers in health care or public health response settings requires attention to credentialing, and training, as well as clinical skills. In addition, effective volunteer managers must not only fill positions to be sure tasks are completed, but also meet the needs of the volunteers in terms of motivation and recognition.

This session will explore potential barriers to integration, and provide examples of innovative strategies that have worked well, including integration of veterinary and mental health volunteers.

  1. Discuss current trends in volunteerism, and describe elements of volunteer program management.
  2. Cite specific examples of how to successfully engage volunteers in specific settings.
  3. Identify common obstacles to volunteer integration and discuss strategies to overcome them.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Environmental Health
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Social Workers
  • Veterinarians

10:15 – 11:30

It’s time consuming and costly to develop exercises that test specific capabilities, provide consistent evaluation criteria, ensure compliance with multiple requirements, and systematically identify corrective actions, not to mention the need to effectively develop and manage improvement plans.

This presentation will demonstrate the web-based Performance Improvement Management System (PIMS) used by the Veterans Health Administration (VHA) to systematically plan, develop, and evaluate emergency exercises and drills; and manage both single-year and multi-year improvement plans (IPs) for Healthcare Systems. Actual events/incidents may also be entered into the system to evaluate event response and develop corrective actions and IPs. The system provides a consistent, efficient, and a cost effective approach to ongoing performance improvement throughout the VHA and enables multi-level participation and collaboration.

PIMS integrates an Event Scheduler, an Event Builder, and an After Action Report/Improvement Plan (AAR/IP) Builder with a robust Performance Improvement Database. Event Scheduler centralizes all VHA exercise and event information; allows users to share information on exercise planning and real response experiences; provides user-customized views of all VHA events; and generates alerts for Exercise Planning Team meetings and IP action items.

Event Builder,

  • Standardizes exercise development
  • Provides step-by-step guidance for developing exercise documentation (e.g., Exercise Plan, Controller/Evaluator Handbook, Timeline/MSEL, and Exercise Evaluation Guides (EEG))
  • Allows multiple hazard selection linked to pre-determined Veteran Integrated Service Network and Veteran’s Administration Medical Center (VAMC) capabilities
  • Links capabilities to The Joint Commission and National Fire Protection Association standards
  • Is consistent with the Homeland Security Exercise and Evaluation Program (HSEEP)

AAR/IP Builder systematically captures standardized EEG data; standardizes exercise and real incident AAR and IP development; includes TJC and NFPA standards; and, easily incorporates previous IP action items that need to be re-exercised. It also enables VAMCs to demonstrate compliance with regulatory and oversight standards; and, captures and documents emergency preparedness strengths, areas for improvement, and best practices. Target audience for this session: emergency managers, exercise/drill planners, and public health and medical responders.

  1. Discuss the advantages of using a web-based automated performance improvement management system
  2. Identify three cost-effective processes included in the VHA PIMS
  3. Compare current processes used at your facility with the features and functions demonstrated in the presentation

  • Certified Counselors
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Social Workers

10:15 – 11:30

From as far back as one can remember, we are taught to make certain everyone likes us and to do and say things to please others. After all, life is just one big popularity contest, right? So it is not surprising that we tend to couple likability with effective leadership. A leader’s job is not to build a team of people that like and are committed to him or her, but that are committed to following him or her in the pursuit of accomplishing a particular task. Likability lets us be champions for our cause, but can hinder good decision making and effectiveness as a leader.

This session will help us to understand the link between likability and effective leadership and provide ideas for harnessing the power of likability.

  1. Identify the traits of a likable person and an effective leader.
  2. Explain the link between likability and effective leadership.
  3. Describe how to develop the traits of likability to improve leadership skills.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Social Workers
  • Veterinarians

10:15 – 11:30

Listen, Protect, Connect (LPC) is a psychological first aid (PFA) model that was developed specifically for use by community members to enhance resilience. Listen, Protect and Connect uses only non-mental health responders with versions that focus on children, parents, family, and the community. This model, when used by responders, can build community resiliency for community disaster victims and responder to responder peer support. This is a key component of the “Anticipate, Plan and Deter” Responder Resilience System in use in Los Angeles County hospitals and clinics and in the State of Minnesota.

In this course participants will receive training on using the Neighbor to Neighbor/Responder version of the Listen, Protect, and Connect PFA model. This presentation will also highlight the successful use of LPC PFA by the U.S. Public Health Service Mental Health Team 2 and the adaptation of LPC PFA for health care workers by Los Angeles County, CA and the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health. This Listen, Protect and Connect (LPC) PFA model can be obtained online from CDMS and ready.gov. By the end of this session, participants will be able to apply and use Listen, Protect and Connect Psychological First Aid in their daily lives and in disaster response with patients, family members and other responders.

  1. Recite varied approaches to Psychological First Aid.
  2. Explain the use of the Listen, Protect and Connect PFA model for emergency responders.
  3. Describe how the USPHS and LA County Dept of Public Health and Emergency Medical Services Agency have succesfully applied LPC to real world experiences.
  4. Apply and use Listen, Protect and Connect Psychological First Aid.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Environmental Health
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Morticians
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Social Workers
  • Veterinarians

10:15 – 11:30

The 9.0 earthquake off the Pacific coast of Tohoku occurred at 14:46 JST on Friday, 11 March 2011. It was the most powerful known earthquake to hit Japan, and one of the five most powerful earthquakes in the world. The earthquake triggered extremely destructive tsunami waves of up to 133 ft and in some cases traveling up to 6 mi inland.

In addition to loss of life and destruction of infrastructure, the tsunami caused a number of nuclear accidents, primarily the ongoing level 7 meltdowns at three reactors in the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant complex, and the associated evacuation zones affecting hundreds of thousands of residents. The Japanese National Police Agency confirmed 15,790 deaths, 5,933 injured and 4,056 people missing across eighteen prefectures, as well as over 125,000 buildings damaged or destroyed.

Residents within a 20 km (12 mi) radius of the Fukushima I Nuclear Power Plant and a 10 km (6.2 mi) radius of the Fukushima II Nuclear Power Plant were evacuated. Unfortunately, those animals that could not be carried were left behind and literally tens of thousands of animals remained in the “No-go” zone. On 2-3 May, a group of radiation and animal rescue experts from the United States and Japan convened to discuss the current crisis and develop steps to provide aid to animals inside the evacuation zone. The committee included representatives from the Japanese Ministry of Environment, United States Department of Agriculture (USDA), United States Army Veterinary Corps, veterinary and toxicology experts, academicians, and representatives from the International Fund for Animal Welfare.

The goal of this presentation will be to present the response procedures and protocols developed during the Summit to monitor, evacuate, and treat animals contaminated by radiation.

  1. Discuss how to include animal decontamination protocols in their training and response plans.
  2. Apply recommendations and protocols from the Japan experience to their Comprehensive Emergency Management Plans.
  3. Develop protocols for recognizing safe levels of radiation when working with animals in or around nuclear evacuation zones.

  • Environmental Health
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Veterinarians

10:15 – 11:30

The health sector around the United States is struggling to meet daily demands for service, particularly to underserved and marginalized populations; disasters and mass casualty events exacerbate the existing strain on local health infrastructure. Currently, health disparities perpetuate conditions in which many people in need cannot access adequate healthcare, creating disparities which are magnified in the event of a disaster. Evidence indicates that diverse communities suffer disproportionately, in both physical and mental health, at every stage of a disaster.

Understanding how socio-cultural factors affect the way people access healthcare systems and utilize resources informs how hospitals and communities can prepare to address these culturally-specific needs of vulnerable populations. This is fundamental to a resilient community and a sustainability health response system and must be the foundation of public health preparedness and healthcare/hospital response planning. Taken together, a robust, mixed-methods approach for comprehensively incorporating marginalized and vulnerable populations into public health and hospital disaster planning is necessary, particularly if offering a model that could promote integration between public health, hospitals and emergency management.

In addition, the implementation of culturally and linguistically appropriate services across the public health, medical, and emergency management aspects of disaster preparedness and response helps ensure the provision of quality emergency health services. Cultural and linguistic competency is thereby an important tool for addressing disparities. Preparedness and response efforts should fit the varying cultural contexts of their community.

The presentation will demonstrate the HHS Office of Minority Health’s Cultural Competency Curriculum for Disaster Preparedness and Crisis Response (DPCR) as an effective and adaptable learning tool for cultural competency and improving services to culturally and linguistically diverse populations.

The DPCR is an accredited online continuing education program that equips disaster personnel with the knowledge, awareness, and skills needed to provide emergency health services to diverse populations.

  1. Examine the relevance and diversity of vulnerable populations.
  2. Demonstrate the need for cultural and linguistically appropriate services in disaster preparedness and crisis response.
  3. Identify the cultural and linguistic competency concepts in disaster preparedness and response.
  4. Analyze common models and best practices for assessing social vulnerability and to evaluate the pros and cons of various approaches.
  5. Discuss a video case study in terms of providing culturally and linguistically appropriate services during a disaster.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers

  • Debra Kreisberg
  • Guadalupe Pacheco, MSW

10:15 – 11:30

Disasters often cause the displacement of patients and providers, who cross state borders to seek safety. While people move, their medical records do not. This creates major problems in accessing and delivering ongoing health care. Therefore the need for integrated health information exchange in times of disaster and in its aftermath is critical.

In 2010, the Southeast Regional HIT-HIE Collaboration (SERCH) initiated a Health Information Exchange (HIE) Disaster Planning Project. This project was conducted through the State Health Policy Consortium (SHPC), an activity of the Office of the National Coordinator for Health Information Technology. The SHPC is funded by the Health Information Technology for Economic and Clinical Health (HITECH) Act, enacted as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009.

The primary goal of the project is to define a set of strategies for sharing health information data among the Southeast and Gulf States, including Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Louisiana, and Texas, during and following a declared disaster. The SERCH project is using lessons from disasters such as Hurricane Katrina and more recently the tornadoes in Joplin, Missouri and Tuscaloosa, Alabama, to develop a strategic plan to allow physicians and patients to access medical records for health care treatment during and after a disaster.

The SERCH team has prepared a White Paper that provides guidance and recommendations to States who wish to understand how to integrate HIE and emergency preparedness activities to improve patient care during a disaster. The White Paper addresses both legal and technical issues pertaining to cross-border exchange of medical records in the context of a disaster. It also proposes new functions for the ESF 8 agencies to engage HIEs and other health care data sources.

During this session members of the SERCH team will provide an overview of Health Information Exchange framework and how it applies to Disaster Preparedness and Response. They will also discuss the Disaster Planning Project in detail and use the session as an opportunity to gather ESF 8 stakeholder feedback and input on next steps.

  1. Describe the general Health Information Exchange (HIE) framework and environment and how it applies to disaster preparedness and response activities.
  2. Explore Emergency Support Function (ESF) 8 approaches to seamless interstate response before, during, and in the aftermath of a declared disaster, and how these practices can facilitate HIE.
  3. Identify potential overlap between ESF 8 response and HIE activities, and how this can be leveraged to improve patient care.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Healthcare Education
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Social Workers

10:15 – 11:30

The care needs of clients entering a response care facility such as a Federal Medical Station or other facilities will have a direct impact on the resources required and the resource allocation. During Hurricane IKE in 2008 a Field Medical Station was opened to receive “Special Needs” medical evacuees from the Hurricane Evacuation Zone. Upon arrival evacuees were classified using the conventional triage system for acuity and most were classified under the Minimal Needs – Green Triage code. However as the shelter population grew to include over 300 special needs/vulnerable population evacuees this classification did not accurately represent the resources needed.

The U.S. Public Health Service Rapid Deployment Force-1 developed and field tested during deployment a rapid screening tool to assign clients during the triage process to one of the five Center for Medicare and Medicaid Services care categories. Once the level of care was identified, discharge planning was then able to focus on the discharge and/or transfer of the higher level of care patients and additional resources needed could be identified. The tool was validated using multiple assessors and was particularly valuable in allocating resources and prioritizing discharge planning.

During this presentation attendees will be instructed on this new rapid assessment tool for use with special needs-vulnerable population during situations when the level of care needs must be identified. The presentation will conclude with discussing an integrated approach to this special population during disasers and how to Put it all Together.

  1. Describe the special needs vulnerable population.
  2. Analyze the current triage systems and demonstrate new approaches.
  3. Explain the Rapid Assessment Tool for identifying level of care needs and how this can be used to identify resources needed.
  4. Discuss an Integrated approach and how to put it all together.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Social Workers

10:15 – 11:30

This presentation will describe the health system response to the total destruction of its 348-bed general hospital in Joplin, MO, on May 22, 2011. A three-phased approach to immediate restoration of hospital services, including inpatient and outpatient behavioral health services, will be described, and the strengths and weaknesses of the approach taken will be discussed. An improved scheme for rapid set up of full-service hospital and clinic facilities based on lessons learned will be presented with significant time and overall cost savings in return to full service health care delivery in a superior operational structure.

  1. Describe the health system level response to the Joplin tornado’s destruction of the hospital.
  2. Describe the sequential response for reinstitution of hospital services in Joplin.
  3. Apply lessons learned in providing temporary hospital facilities to other field situations.

  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Respiratory Therapists

10:15 – 11:30

Force Protection: Safety and Health Lessons Learned 2011: Changing Strategies for the Safety of the Disaster Healthcare Responder in the 21st Century

The National Disaster Medical System (NDMS) responds to public health events of consequence both nationally and internationally. Challenges faced during 2011 deployments included safety issues related to ionizing radiation, extreme heat events experienced during multiple field training exercises and health and safety related airborne exposures in the aftermath of flood response activities.

Evolving missions, novel requests from US Government agencies, and an ever increasing and sophisticated talent pool among disaster healthcare responders added unique missions previously unconsidered. Novel assignments deployed in under 48-hours have included rail-transport medical teams , public health assessment teams deployed to wide areas and the development and integration of safety and health systems for oil clean-up workers. Subsequently, the health and safety system has grown through response learning their protective measures were captured within the products provided by the Operational Medicine Program: The Hazard Evaluation Risk Assessment (HERA) tool; the Health and Safety Plan (HASP) template and various safety and health related programs and operating procedures.

This presentation examines each of these unique hazards, which presented during the NDMS 2011 response season. It describes the protocol identified to address them and examines how these protocols are being institutionalized, wiith emphasis on rapid and light response capabilities. The Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR)/NDMS protocols now include responder and environmental measurements and pre-screening, retrospective exposure assessments and integration of health and safety response assets personnel from other deployed agencies. Communication of these products and procedures is now occurring electronically.

  1. Identify special hazards associated with response to potential radiological hazardous situations, thermal extremes, long-term deployments and long-term public health hazards.
  2. Identify the special hazards associated with rapid and light NDMS deployment activities.
  3. Identify NDMS Force Protection Programs and their components in place to protect responders from the hazards of ionizing radiation, temperature extremes and post disaster public health hazards, in both traditional and rapid deployment scenarios.
  4. Explain the worker safety and health requirements that new faster, lighter, smaller, specialty response teams will create, as well as remedies.
  5. Utilize and retrieve information from the NDMS Force Protection, Health and Safety E-Lear Site (online), and use the site to access protective measures.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Environmental Health
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Morticians
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Social Workers
  • Veterinarians

  • Linda J. Cashion, RN
  • Joseph A. Cocciardi, PhD, MS, CSP, CIH, REHS, RS
  • Tim Davis, MD, MPH

13:00 – 14:15

Over the past few years, media reports regarding workplace violence occurring within healthcare facilities have become far too common. For example, within the past few weeks, there have been shootings at hospitals in Baltimore and Suburban Washington DC and a long term care facility in North Carolina. For many facilities, the risk of an active shooter incident has subsequently become a priority risk within their Hazard Vulnerability Analysis (HVA). This requires an increased need for a carefully thought out response plan that is fully integrated within the various levels of the healthcare facility as well as among area law enforcement professionals.

This presentation will focus on planning considerations for an active shooter from three perspectives; law enforcement early recognition and response recommendations, hospital emergency manger concerns for preparing a response plan and healthcare community response issues for supporting a facility impacted by this type of incident.

  1. Discuss early recognition and de-escalation activities for reducing the risk of hospital-based workplace violence.
  2. Cite specific response considerations once an active shooter incident becomes imminent.
  3. Outline the issues an emergency manager faces in writing an active shooter response plan.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Healthcare Education
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Nurses
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Social Workers

13:00 – 14:15

Yale: New Haven Health Systems (YNHHS) Center for Emergency Preparedness and Healthcare Solutions (CEPHS), under a contract with the Federal Emergency Management Agency, YNHHS, conducted extensive research into the evacuation and sheltering needs of the medically dependent population. A medically dependent individual can be defined as a person requiring a caregiver, medications or specialized medical equipment to sustain life or quality of life.

Based on this research numerous issues were identified as effecting the decision to evacuate or shelter-in-place this population. It is vital that state and local Emergency Management Officials and agencies involved in disaster planning be capable of identifying these factors and the effect that they have on determining an appropriate course of action to follow when making the determination to evacuate or shelter this population in place. Based on their ability to recognize and consider these issues, planners may then weigh and include them when developing or updating state, county or local emergency management plans.

  1. Explain the difference between a population with special needs and those considered to be medically dependent.
  2. Explain the difference between a “no notice event” requiring evacuation or sheltering-in-place versus an “event with notice” and, will be able to provide examples.
  3. List a minimum of 5 factors to consider when determining whether to evacuate or shelter-in-place individuals with medical dependencies.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Social Workers

13:00 – 14:15

This course will focus on the three primary pillars that support any organization and the three things a leader must be in order to successfully lead. All organizations are grounded on leadership, training, and resources. All great leaders must be a servant, a teacher, and a vessel.

Leadership and training are inexplicably interconnected and are then blended into the organization’s resources in totality which of course includes the people. Leaders and trainers are both in the “people business” and a failure to thrive in this arena will lead to dismal organizational performance, if not failure. Successful Leaders and Trainers place the resources of an organization into an “environment and mindset” whereby creating expectations, and then managing those expectations.

Many times, the actions of successful leaders and trainers can be compared to heavy equipment as they may function as cranes, bulldozers, and tow trucks or a combination of each when leading and training their groups. The success or failure of an organization, is a direct reflection on the proper use of the three pillars, the three things, and the three actions that leaders and trainers must understand, be, and use.

  1. Explain the concept of the three pillars of an organization.
  2. Discuss the concept of the three things a Leader/Trainer must be.
  3. Describe the concepts of using a heavy equipment analogy of the three actions a Leader/Trainer must use.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Environmental Health
  • Healthcare Education
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Morticians
  • Nurses
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Social Workers
  • Veterinarians

13:00 – 14:15

There are many instances when a cohesive well-practiced response team must work uncomfortably close with a comparable team. Given human nature, combined with the fact that these teams are often made up of Super Type A personalities, the management skills of their leaders will be severely tested. Experience in these situations may be the best teacher.

This presentation will offer the lessons identified by a team leader who has frequently encountered this situation and blended teams, had his team supplemented by others, and supplemented others with his own. The results demonstrate that with careful coordination, mutual respect, and awareness of the potential pitfalls these scenarios often present, successful integration of efforts are not only possible but are quite likely.

  1. Describe two scenarios where teams must be integrated.
  2. Describe the challenges to the integration of a cohesive team into another
  3. Discuss three techniques for the integration of one team with another

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Environmental Health
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Morticians
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers
  • Veterinarians

13:00 – 14:15

The infant, child, and adolescent are all a part of the vulnerable pediatric population. Based upon anatomical, physiological, developmental, and psychosocial differences, the pediatric patient must be considered separately from adults in terms of disaster planning. Unique pediatric issues of mitigation, preparedness, response, and recovery do exist. The most challenging is the proactive nature of mitigation.

A key aspect of mitigation is identifying the pediatric population and their relationship to various hazards. Routinely, a Hazard Vulnerability Analysis (HVA) is performed in a well defined community. The community, in turn, is defined by key stakeholders including, but not limited to, public safety and security, public works, public health, schools, colleges, and universities, housing, utilities, health care providers, industry, service and religious organizations, and Federally funded local response initiatives.

Other key elements to be considered include geography, residential patterns, highways or other infrastructure, and climate. Once completed, the HVA will allow an institution to compile a list of potential hazards. Hospitals will then be able to prioritize planning efforts to deal with the top ten hazards and develop their preparedness efforts accordingly. However, since children are a unique population, there is little evidence on how to perform a Pediatric Hazard Vulnerability Analysis (PHVA). This is quite concerning, especially since approximately 25% of the US population fits in the pediatric age range. Therefore, we applied the use of basic hazard vulnerability principles to develop a novel PHVA tool using a web-based interface.

The setting of our PHVA was the city of Chicago. The process details probability, risk and preparedness for human, technological and natural events that may occur within a hospital’s area of operations with a focus on the pediatric population. Through a web-based interface, supplemental information and reference material assists subject matter experts as they prepare their PHVA report. This process will step the user through the PHVA, where at the conclusion they will have a digital/printable document containing the required PHVA tables. User-based profiles will allow specified users to initiate their individual reports, save their work, and return to update, review, and print their PHVA report as needed. Our major goal is to demonstrate the PHVA process and provide lessons learned.

  1. Demonstrate the utility of geographic information systems when performing a pediatric hazard vulnerability analysis.
  2. Implement a web-based approach to performing a hospital pediatric hazard vulnerability analysis.
  3. Apply lessons learned when considering the performance of a pediatric hazard vulnerability analysis.

  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Healthcare Education
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Respiratory Therapists

13:00 – 14:15

Presenters will provide information about collaborative efforts in Washington State and a collaborative effort in Okeechobee County, Florida. The Emergency Management Director from the Shoalwater Bay Indian Tribe and the Emergency Management Operations Manager for the Seminole Tribe of Florida will join the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) Coordinators from Tulalip Tribes and Snohomish County. Three members of the panel from Washington State will discuss how they have worked together on public health preparedness and response with a focus on participation in the regional healthcare coalitions.

Healthcare coalitions are regional partnerships that work to improve our ability to meet the dramatically increased demand for medical care that is expected during a major health emergency. Healthcare coalitions consist of representatives from public health, hospitals, tribal health clinics, healthcare providers, emergency medical services, home health care, long term care, mental health, MRC and emergency management.

The panel member from the Seminole Tribe of Florida will discuss how the Seminole Tribe of Florida has worked with local, state, and Federal agencies for emergency preparedness and response before, during, and after any disaster. He will also discuss the relationship that was built with the Okeechobee Medical Reserve Corps during the H1N1 pandemic.

The presentations will focus on the collaboration between tribes, counties, city, and state entities with an emphasis through the work of the MRC. The audience will be encouraged to share their challenges and successes in similar efforts in their local community. The presenters will facilitate a conversation to explore ways that Tribal, County, City, and State organizations can work together to benefit public health preparedness and response .

  1. Describe the importance of partnering between Tribal, Local and State jurisdictions for public health preparedness.
  2. Identify stragegies to jointly build resilience that will be successful for participants in their local community.
  3. Examine the benefits to both Tribal and local jurisdictions, of partnership in public health preparedness.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Healthcare Education
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Psychologists
  • Social Workers

13:00 – 14:15

Crisis communication today is a vastly different animal than it was just five years ago. The average time it takes for a story to be picked up and splayed across the media has shrunk from days to minutes. The very definition of who is a member of the media has changed.

Many government and healthcare communicators are struggling to keep up with the changes and feel overwhelmed by the greatly expanded demands placed on their office due to this “new media.” This session will feature a tour of the most important social media websites and allow for discussion of the relative benefits—and shortcomings—of each.

Examples will be woven throughout the session to give guidance on how, and how not to, integrate social media into your agency’s or organization’s crisis communication plans. Special attention will be paid to satisfying those in your organization who are uncomfortable with using social media and techniques for addressing those concerns will be developed and provided. Specific considerations that will be addressed include:

  • Policy, goals and procedures development
  • Pre-crisis and crisis messaging
  • Message tailoring for different audiences, especially vulnerable and underserved populations
  • Opportunities to continue learning about social media

  1. Describe the relative benefits and shortcomings of four social media network and how each can be used before, during and after a crisis.
  2. Describe how to integrate social media into communications plans, policies and procedures, with a special focus on liability concerns.
  3. Describe two best practice examples that demonstrate how social media can effectively reach and engage traditionally vulnerable and underserved populations.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Environmental Health
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Morticians
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Social Workers
  • Veterinarians

13:00 – 14:15

Recent history has shown repeatedly that during periods of crisis and natural disasters the National Guard and civilian agencies are virtually always involved and tend to work well together, even if impromptu. However, those of us within the domestic operations community realize that the impromptu relationships that develop are essential, but are never going to be able to fully exploit a well planned and exercised relationship.

The forgotten heroes during a domestic crisis are the civilian volunteers and Non-Governmental Agencies (NGOs). However, those personnel are typically an afterthought in developing relationships down on the ground level, especially within military exercises. Within the military there is a saying “train as you fight.” To actually live up to that mantra the military must continue to foster relationships with civilian volunteers and NGOs since that is the “way we would fight” in military support to domestic agencies (MSCA).

One of the newest developing capabilities of the National Guard to start getting some greater public awareness are the CBRNE Enhanced Response Force Package (CERFP) and Homeland Response Force (HRF). The medical capability of the CERFP and HRFs is certainly equivalent to the DMAT teams, which are one of the better known and capable medical response teams. However, in addition to the DMAT teams, Medical Reserve Corps are capabilities that would certainly be available in a domestic crisis.

Awareness alone does not build the relationships necessary; teams need to understand one others’ capabilities and deficiencies, prior to a crisis in order to be successful. In local, county, state, and national level exercises there is always going to be an opportunity to incorporate volunteer teams such as Medical Reserve Corps and NGOs to conduct side-by-side training.

Understanding the nature of volunteer teams and organizations requires that planning be flexible and creative with scenarios that will allow the participation of volunteer organizations. Understanding legal limitations or requirements for both civilian volunteer teams, and military personnel, can also be used as a guideline when developing training and standard operating procedures. In this session we will explore the planning and implementation of a joint exercise that involved MRC/ ESAR-VHP/ American Red Cross and Military partners and the lessons learned.

  1. Explain the capabilities and limitations of National Guard First Responders such as the CBRNE Enhanced Response Force Package (CERFP).
  2. Evaluate and refine potential best practices for integration of National Guard First Responders and Medical Reserve Corps volunteers during Disaster Responses.
  3. Evaluate and refine best practices for integration of National Guard First Responders and civilian healthcare providers at the point of impact including triage, stabilization and patient tracking mechanisms.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Environmental Health
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Nurses
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Social Workers

13:00 – 14:15

On September 16, 2011, the National Championship Air Races and Air Show in Reno, Nevada quickly transformed from a renowned air show into a horrific war scene after veteran pilot Jimmy Leeward crashed his vintage P-51 Mustang on the tarmac just feet away from the VIP box seats. Immediately, the Regional Emergency Medical Services Authority (REMSA) personnel, along with Reno and Airport Authority Fire Departments, and a host of volunteers responded to the dozens of injured spectators. Within 62 minutes REMSA had transported 54 injured to three area hospitals.

After REMSA’s transport was completed, the secondary phase of the tragedy began. Although the injured were being treated at hospitals, the tarmac resembled a war zone with the debris and human remains scattered across the tarmac. Not only were there nearly a dozen fatalities, but the sudden and violent nature of the deaths completely shocked the spectators, responders, and anyone at the scene throughout the first 48 hours. The Washoe County Health District (WCHD) began their response immediately on Friday following the crash and became more involved as the incident unfolded.

Saturday morning, when the Medical Examiner (ME) asked for support recovering remains from the tarmac, the Medical Reserve Corps (MRC) provided four medical volunteers to walk the tarmac and recover remains. Additionally, another group of MRC volunteers worked with the Unified Victim Identification System (UVIS), inputting data to help identify the recovered remains. This assistance expedited the ME’s task of making positive identifications on the victims to bring families resolution.

Based on the severity of the situation, the decision was made to open a Family Assistance Center (FAC) to obtain the UVIS information and to provide resource assistance to the families of the injured and missing who were arriving into Reno. The Washoe County Public Health Emergency Response Coordinator, working with the Regional Emergency Operations Center, set up an FAC. The FAC was operationally ready by 11:00 AM the day following the crash.

Utilizing 10 mental health volunteers from the MRC along with volunteers from supporting agencies, the FAC served 17 families impacted by the event. In total, the WCHD worked with 19 other agencies and organizations to support the overwhelmed medical infrastructure, providing services to the Medical Examiner, the victims’ families, National Transportation and Safety Board, and the local community.

  1. Describe the types of Emergency Response and Medical infrastructure involved in a mass fatality event; identify their roles in the ICS Unified Command System. Based on the acuity of a mass fatality event, forecast the types of services needed.
  2. Explain the basic equipment and training needed for staff and volunteers to meet the needs of essential agencies (Medical Examiner’s Office, Airport Authority, local hospitals, call centers) as well as serving the needs of the community.
  3. Analyze the events and identify goals and objectives for a multi-faceted mass fatality response plan.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Environmental Health
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Morticians
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Social Workers

13:00 – 14:15

This presentation will include discussion of a risk based algorithm for decision making in the disaster sheltering of special medical evacuees presenting with their companion animals to a US Health and Human Services Federal Medical Station (FMS) established in College Station, TX in the wake of Hurricane Ike in 2008. The FMS was established at the Texas A & M University and was managed by a USPHS Rapid Deployment Force 1 Team of US Public Health Service Commissioned Officers.

Special emphasis will be placed on the special human-animal bond issues associated with individuals with special physical or mental health needs who seek disaster sheltering for themselves and their pets. Many of these evacuees had lost beloved pets in prior evacuations due to their inability to control the management of their animals and a lack of physical, mental and/or monetary resources to facilitate return of their animals to them at the conclusion of the evacuation.

This session will, also, include information about the most common types of injuries and illnesses experienced by USAR dogs during deployment. The potential for injuries and illnesses is an important concern when personnel are deployed from the United States to respond to disasters in foreign countries, particularly because of the unique challenges that exist with respect to environmental and endemic hazards.

The only disasters for which there is injury and illness data for FEMA USAR dogs was the Oklahoma City bombing of April 19, 1995, and the WTC disaster of September 11, 2001. Little is know of injury/illness for deployments outside the United States. The recent international responses including Haiti and Japan highlighted this, as well, as the need for standard operating procedures, potential human health concerns for both response personnel and members of the general public that may come in contact with contaminated animals, and the current absence of trained animal decontamination teams able to respond at local, state, Federal and International levels.

  1. Apply appropriate interaction of veterinarians, medical health, mental health and other public health professionals in the post-disaster management of high medical risk disaster evacuees which evacuate with their companion animals.
  2. Identify the injuries and illnesses experienced by the USAR dogs that deployed to Haiti following the earthquake of January 12, 2010.
  3. Utilize a methodical approach to determining the best disaster management options for special medical needs disaster evacuees which present with companion animals to which they are particularly bonded.
  4. Utilize the injury and illness information to guide responders in what is needed for deployment.
  5. Discuss current resources and procedures for animal decontamination and what is are still needed.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Environmental Health
  • Healthcare Education
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Morticians
  • Nurses
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Social Workers
  • Veterinarians

  • Lori E. Gordon, DVM
  • Lisa A. Murphy, VMD, DABT
  • Charlotte Spires, DVM, MPH, DACVPM

15:00 – 16:30

The presentation will provide a fast-paced overview of the bioterrorist and emerging infectious disease threat—addressing both public heath and agricultural vulnerabilities. To characterize the threat and the daunting research challenges we face, the presenter will draw upon his extensive experience in high consequence pathogen research at USAMRIID, biological arms control treaty (BWC) and Trilateral Agreement compliance, and offensive biowarfare program counter-proliferation efforts in the Former Soviet Union.

The presentation will also describe issues and challenges associated with updating critical research infrastructure in the U.S. by highlighting the recent selection of Manhattan KS as the replacement site for the Plum Island Animal Disease Center with the $700M National Bio and Agrodefense Facility (NBAF). Additionally, the presentation will recount personal experiences and emergency response lessons learned during the 1990 Reston Ebola outbreak, recounted in the #1 NY Times bestseller “The Hot Zone” by Richard Preston.

  1. Discuss bioterrorism and the challenges associated with adequate prevention and development of countermeasures and response strategies.
  2. Explain lessons learned from an emergency response to the emergence of the exotic Ebola virus in nonhuman primates in the US.
  3. Assess the dimensions of cold war offensive biowarfare programs and their troubling legacy for today’s world.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Environmental Health
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Social Workers

15:00 – 16:30

Learning about leadership and the qualities inherent in a leader can stem from many sources including,

  1. The observation of great leaders in action (role models), and to some extent the opposite extreme of dealing with “non-leaders” in leadership roles;
  2. The personal lessons learned of being placed in leadership positions
  3. From good old-fashioned “book work” and reading about leadership. This presentation will emphasize ten qualities of leadership, that when lacking or inappropriately implemented would lead to leadership going askew.

These qualities include the following,

  1. A leader keeps calm and cool
  2. A leader is a good communicator
  3. A leader provides perspective and context
  4. A leader makes decisions
  5. A leader is adaptable
  6. A leader is a role model
  7. A leader sets a high ethical tone
  8. A leader delegates appropriately
  9. A leader builds and supports teamwork and cooperation
  10. A leader is positive, encouraging, and realistically optimistic.

Methods of dealing with leadership going askew will be discussed in an open forum.

  1. List five qualities of a leader.
  2. Describe the 4 “D’s” of leadership.
  3. List three examples of how to deal with leadership going askew.

  • Certified Counselors
  • Dentists
  • Emergency Physicians
  • EMT/Paramedics
  • Environmental Health
  • Health Education Specialists
  • Healthcare Executives
  • Industrial Hygienists
  • Marriage & Family Therapists
  • Morticians
  • Nurses
  • Pharmacists
  • Physicians
  • Respiratory Therapists
  • Social Workers
  • Veterinarians

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